Process Oriented – Goal Oriented (POGO)™

One of my profs (automatic control systems) in senior year at Uni (this is not what we call it here in the states, btw, and so my tongues are twisting again) often expounded on the distinction between hypothetically “two kinds of achievers” as he saw it, splitting the herd in two like we often want to do for some odd reason, to make things seem even, possibly. Two is even, three is odd. Taking it to four is two too many, and so onward.

What this approach may be assuming is that anyone could be so monolithic or that one approach is always the superior method. What seems to happen more often (when we give it the chance) is that both seemingly “pure” approaches is not sufficient by itself for every situation. Discernment is needed to select the proper way at any juncture. No easy way down the rocky path, and closing the eyes is not recommended, to put it simply.

When priority for proper procedure becomes an intensified focus, the goal could get up and walk away and nobody might notice. Of course, we usually expect not to contend with a moving target, so it seems better to be process oriented, the majority of the time, and we can easily decide it is always better that way.

This can sadly lead to a situation where the pavement is being stared at, and the oncoming traffic is not seen in time to avoid being flattened. This is different from staring at the oncoming traffic and running into a parked vehicle, or any other situation where the attention was confined to the wrong area.

From what I can tell, I have not paid enough attention in major, vital areas while paying too much of it in other follies or dreams, or just not paying enough total attention, while trying to be certain that I did pay attention when and where I should. This, paying attention to my own attentiveness, is probably a form of insanity, especially if I keep doing it expecting the result to change by magic or whatever.

And I’d be the last to know, or to want to know, and so I probably would not know. They say that crazy people don’t ask. But I forgot what the question was, so I have not asked it, just to play it safe.


The Little Red Hen

There once was a little red hen who lived on a farm. The hen’s friends were a little black dog, a big orange cat, and a little yellow goose. One day, the red hen found some grains of wheat. “I can make bread from this,” thought the red hen.

The little red hen asked, “Who will help me plant the wheat?”

“Not I,” said the little black dog.
“Not I,” said the big orange cat.
“Not I,” said the little yellow goose.

“Then I will do it myself,” said the little red hen. And she planted the wheat without any help at all.

The little red hen asked, “Who will help me cut the wheat?”

“Not I,” said the little black dog.
“Not I,” said the big orange cat.
“Not I,” said the little yellow goose.

“Then I will do it myself,” said the little red hen. And she cut the wheat without any help at all.

The tired little red hen asked, “Who will help me take the wheat to the mill and grind it into flour?”

“Not I,” said the little black dog.
“Not I,” said the big orange cat.
“Not I,” said the little yellow goose.

“Then I will do it myself,” said the tired little red hen. So she took the wheat to the mill and ground it into flour without any help at all.

The very, very tired little red hen asked, “Who will help me bake the bread?”

“Not I,” said the little black dog.
“Not I,” said the big orange cat.
“Not I,” said the little yellow goose.

“Then I will do it myself,” said the very, very tired little red hen. And she baked the bread without any help at all.

The hot, fresh bread smelled very good. The little red hen asked, “Now, who will help me eat this bread?”

“I will!” said the little black dog.
“I will!” said the big orange cat.
“I will!” said the little yellow goose.

“No, you won’t! I will do it myself!” yelled the little red hen. And she ate the bread without any help at all.

The End

From pbskids.org, but I did not grab the URI or the URL either, too.


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